Schools will remain closed for rest of 2019-20 academic year

GBHS students will not return to campus until August; seniors on track to graduate will receive a diploma

The+novel+COVID-19+has+affected+millions+of+people+around+the+world+and+has+triggered+worldwide+school+closures+%E2%80%93+including+at+Granite+Bay+High.+

Centers for Disease Control

The novel COVID-19 has affected millions of people around the world and has triggered worldwide school closures – including at Granite Bay High.

UPDATE: April 3, 2020

On Friday, April 3, Roseville Joint Union High School District superintendent Denise Herrmann announced that district schools will be closed for the remainder of the school year.

The decision was jointly made by superintendents across Placer County, in consultation with Placer County Health Officer Dr. Aimee Sisson.

“Based on modeling of the COVID-19 outbreak in California and in Placer County, it will not be safe for students to return to school in a traditional in-person model through the end of May into early June,” Sisson said in a statement released to parents and students earlier today (Friday, April 3).

Herrmann noted that distance learning will continue for RJUHSD students after the conclusion of spring break. Seniors on track to graduate will still receive a diploma.

* * *

On Thursday, March 26, Roseville Joint Union High School District superintendent Denise Herrmann announced that all district schools have extended their school closures until at least May 1.

“We all want students back in school and for our communities to return to normalcy as soon as possible,” Herrmann said in an announcement sent to students and parents. “But, not at the risk of their health and safety. … We will continue to diligently monitor the situation and re-evaluate our steps in the coming weeks.”

No one knows for certain whether students will be able to return to campus for the rest of the school year.

We will continue to diligently monitor the situation and re-evaluate our steps in the coming weeks.”

— Denise Herrmann

For now, the best thing that members of the community can do is follow the quarantine directed by the state in order to diminish the spread of  COVID-19 so that students and staff can return to business as usual as soon as safely possible.

Many seniors understand that maintaining good health within the community is the top priority right now, but that doesn’t mean that they aren’t disappointed at the possibility of finishing out the year without a proper goodbye to their friends, their teachers and the school that has been a second home to them for the past four years.

“Honestly it sucks,” senior Julie Markham said, “but I’m trying not to be really upset because that won’t do (any good). (All of us as seniors) are able to spend time with our families before we leave for college, which is one positive from all of this.”

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