To the man on the motorcycle…

To+the+man+on+the+motorcycle...

Some girls call themselves the luckiest girls in the world after they get their dream job or after getting married. For me, I called myself the luckiest girl in the world a few Sundays ago for a fairly unique reason.

I had just filled up my tank and I was leaving the gas station to go home. Unbeknownst to me, I had left my wallet on top of my car.

As I left the gas station, a nice man on his motorcycle let me merge in front of him. I continued my nice eight minute drive home, singing to to my favorite songs from the Hamilton soundtrack on full blast.

Turning into my neighborhood, the car behind me turned as well and honked at me. The lady driving the car told me she saw my wallet fall off the roof of my car and wanted to let me know.

After nearly 45 minutes of my dad and I searching the street for my wallet, we headed home, dejected.

I was definitely upset with myself for making such a silly mistake. But I was quite upset that someone had taken my wallet in that 10 minutes it took to me to get back to where it had presumably fallen off my car.

I canceled my debit card and made my DMV appointment to renew my license for THREE weeks later.

A few hours after making my DMV appointment, our home phone rang.

The man on the phone told me he was riding a motorcycle and saw my wallet fall of my car. He said he picked it up as he drove by it. He said he looked me up on the internet and found my phone number. He asked when I wanted to pick my wallet up.

I felt like the luckiest girl in the world.

Not every person is a wallet stealing thief, but when something goes wrong, we are beyond ready to jump to that conclusion. Losing my wallet was entirely my fault and while I was upset with myself, I was pretty upset with the “thief” that took my wallet.

My mom suggested that someone could call me saying they found my wallet. I immediately said that would never happen because my phone number wasn’t in my wallet and no one would ever travel to our home to deliver my wallet, or go to the trouble of finding my phone number.

We seem to constantly make society out to be destined for the worst. In a time where tragedies fill the news, we think the of the majority of people as selfish, untrustworthy humans.

Too often we fail to have hope for our society and hope that people actually do the right thing out of their natural kindness.

The man on the motorcycle who went through the trouble of finding me didn’t benefit from returning my wallet. And the woman who followed me all the way to the edge of my neighborhood didn’t get anything in return. They both just wanted to help me.

When I thanked the man on the motorcycle for being so kind he told me that we need more good karma in this world.

The man on the motorcycle has made me see in a different light. There are people who care about each other and there are people who will return a lost wallet. Those sort of people inspire you to pay good acts forward.

It’s important that we appreciate those people and try to be like them in making others – even those who make mistakes – feel like they are the luckiest in the world.

 

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