Solano raises funds through enchiladas

Solano raises funds through enchiladas

One thousand. That’s roughly the number of enchiladas that are being made by the Spanish Club, Spanish teachers and other Granite Bay High School students in order to help Spanish teacher Gerardo Solano cover the costs of adopting children from China. Solano came to the Spanish Club in early August with the idea of teaching the club how to make enchiladas and then proceed to sell them to students and families as a way to raise money for a good cause.

Over 2,000 dollars have been raised and sent to Across The World Adoptions: the organization which Solano used for his adoption.

The money that has been raised up to this point is far more than what was expected.

“Personally, I thought we would raise 500 dollars at the most,” Spanish teacher Sra. Hill said. “I had no idea it would get this much attention.” Solano also claimed he thought the fundraiser would not receive as much attention as it has.

Solano expressed that he was shocked with how much love and generosity the community has provided to fund the adoption. Even students who are not in Solano’s
class or have never had him as a teacher are volunteering to make enchiladas and show their support.

GBHS Junior Katie Hartmeier is among those who have decided to help. “I found out about it from Sra. Hill when she came into my class and asked the students to sign up to volunteer at the fundraiser,” Hartmeier said. “I thought it sounded like a great idea!”

Hartmeier said she was inspired by Solano and his family’s kindness.

“I think it’s amazing that he’s adopting these kids and giving them an opportunity and a home,” Hartmeier said.

The support from students at Granite Bay has been an immense help to Solano along with the members of the Spanish Club who have been planning the event since the commencement.

“The Spanish Club chose to do this fundraiser because it represented what Sr. Solano was passionate about,” said GBHS senior Lexi Kindrick who is currently the Vice President of the Spanish Club.

Further support can be seen from the Water Project Club and Sra. Cova. They have offered their support by raising funds for the adoption.

“What Sr. Solano is doing it truly remarkable and inspirational,” Kindrick said. “The Spanish Club is honored to represent a fundraiser that means more than life to a teacher who inspires us all.”

The club had originally organized one night to cook all of the enchiladas, but with the overwhelming amount of orders that had been put in, they decided that two nights were necessary.

On the nights of October seventh and ninth, about 10 students went to the house of Alina and Jordan Poczobutt, who are seniors at Granite Bay.

All of 91 enchilada orders were completed.

As the fundraiser is now over, Solano and his family have prepared to the best of their abilities for the new kids.

“It’s a little hard to prepare for the unknown. We didn’t know what size clothes the kids would be wearing or the toys that would be appropriate for their development,” Solano said.

Through meeting others in the Down Syndrome community, Solano learned that orphaned children with Down Syndrome end up on the streets, never having a family.

“It’s a terrible fate that none of us would wish upon our own children. We decided that we could add another child to our life and a special friend for our son, someone who could relate to him and frankly someone as awesome as he is.” Solano said. “That’s where the idea was birthed.” Solano and his family decided to adopt from China again because of what a positive experience they had the first time.

Their first adopted child came from an organization called Reece’s Rainbow.

“We saw her picture and fell head over heels in love with her,” Solano said. “She just happened to be born in China.”

Solano has had no regrets since the adoption.

“She was the best decision we ever made,” Solano said.

Along with their daughter, Solano’s family just recently adopted a little boy and girl from China through ATWA, the organization all funds are being donated to.

“The act of rescuing a child from the fate that awaits them brings one to tears,” Solano said.

“All the work to redeem these children comes to a culmination where it is reality.”

Solano and his family look forward to making memories with the children and seeing them grow.

“I’m most excited about watching all of these children fulfill their destinies. I see greatness in them and expect nothing less,” Solano said. “They are here to change us, to make a difference in our world.”

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