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Referees reprimanded for disputed calls

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Landen Acosta

More stories from Landon Acosta

Students gain admission
February 1, 2019

Players and coaches must understand referees only control the game to an extent

A referee signals to the head referee during the varsity football game at Oak Ridge High School.

Sidney Zabell

A referee signals to the head referee during the varsity football game at Oak Ridge High School.

  There’s no ball game without the sometimes hated, but absolutely necessary, referee.

  The referee has been an essential part of every high school sports game for decades. Entrusted to officiate the outcome of every play on the field and court, referees not only judge each play, but are judged themselves for the way they officiate the game. Referees can substantially affect which team wins the game because of their authority over how the game is ran.

  Specifically, in boys’ volleyball and football, the referee must be unbiased throughout the entire game and must remain unswayed by jaunting statements made by coaches, the fans or players. If the referees have any personal relationship with the players, fans or coaches, they cannot let it affect how they would officiate the game in any way.

  “Fair decisions and not being biased, for the most part, in the way they officiate the games are good,” sophomore Matthew Ross said.

  Boys’ volleyball has many different variables in which a referee can be considered good or bad.

  Playing volleyball at Granite Bay High School for four years, and as well at Pepperdine University, Tyler Jaynes is currently a coach for the GBHS boys’ volleyball program.

Anytime the coach will make calls at the referee, they can get carded because they are supposed to talk to him through the team captain, but in the heat of the moment they don’t always obey that rule.”

— Matthew Ross

  “Some of the rules of volleyball are a little judgemental, depending on the level of play: high school, college or beyond,” Jaynes said. “Usually at the high school level it’s less strict.”

  In the world of boys’ volleyball, there are many different things a team can be fouled on: rotations, in bounds, contact with the net or unruly coaches and players.

  “You know, coaches get rowdy and referees are allowed to eject them from the game,” Ross said. “Anytime the coach will make calls at the referee, they can get carded because they are supposed to talk to him through the team captain, but in the heat of the moment they don’t always obey that rule.”

  The referee has control over the game to a certain extent, however, Jaynes feels that the best team will win in the end, regardless of the calls.

  “A lot of times people will get frustrated at the referees because the game didn’t go their way, but I believe that you and your team have control of your destiny,” Jaynes said. “Regardless if a ref makes a good call or one you don’t agree with, it’s you and your team’s mission to play well enough as a team that (the referees) don’t have a say over who really wins or loses.”

  The pressure that is bestowed upon the referee is daunting. There must be compassion for referees in any sport because they may still be learning the rules of their role.

Even if there’s a call you don’t agree with, it happens. People make mistakes.”

— Tyler Jaynes

  “They are being looked at by the coaches, players, parents and everyone’s eyes are on them,” Jaynes said. “Even if there’s a call you don’t agree with, it happens. People make mistakes.”

  Experience is definitely a factor in the caliber of the referees’ calls as well.

  “You may get a ref who has been doing it for two years and then you might get one who has been doing it for ten,” Ross said.

  The job of officiating a game can be nerve-racking as well as intimidating. There is a level of compassion and understanding towards referees that is absent.

  Everything is a learning experience, especially when making the decisions referees must.

About the Contributors
Landon Acosta, sports editor

Landon is a senior, and this is his second term on the Gazette/GBT.org staff. He is a sports editor.

Sidney Zabell, Co-editor-in-chief

Sidney is a senior at Granite Bay High School who is in her third year on the Gazette/GraniteBayToday.org staff. She is one of five co-editors-in-chief...

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